Student Council

What are Student Council are working on?

Student Council are currently working on rebuilding the old nursery into an area for students to use to hang out, possibly for teachers to use for more interactive lessons and for students to do work there. This should be completed by January 2018. We are also working on a food bank for the homeless in the festive period.


What are the aims of Student Council?

  • It gives students a voice
  • Helps students to see themselves as active members of a community
  • Teaches students democratic skills and about the democratic process
  • Improves decision making generally within the school
  • Provide a basis for active learning of important life skills, such as speaking and listening skills, teamwork, emotional literacy, problem-solving, moral reasoning skills, self-esteem and self confidence


What makes our student council successful?

    • Have clear terms of expectations
    • Have a written constitution (powers, elections, meetings)
    • Are genuinely representative
    • Are accountable (the whole student body is involved)
    • Have an adult facilitator
    • Are supported by SMT
    • Have elected officers e.g. a chair
    • Meet regularly- minimum of twice per half term
    • Use formal procedures (make minutes)
    • Involve all students (regularly consultation/feedback)
    • Are properly resourced (budget, access to IT and photocopier)
    • Are given training
    • Have a good communication system ( notice board/ school website)
    • Are actively promoted by SMT in school and externally (prospectus)


Every Child Matters

School councils are an excellent way to contribute to achieving the Every Child Matters aims for our school and for the individuals involved. This highlights five 'outcomes' and shows how school councils contribute towards them:

  • Be healthy
  • Stay safe
  • Enjoy and achieve
  • Make a positive contribution
  • Achieve economic well-being
"School councils can be a most excellent training ground in responsibility for future citizens."

Professor Crick, 1998 Chair of the Advisory Group on Citizenship