Year 8 History

How significant were the Tudors?

  • Use historical vocabulary in your work and use new vocabulary about the Tudors.
  • Analyse the chronological place of the Tudors in British History.
  • Use some accurate and relevant knowledge and information about the Tudors in your explanations and link this to the historical concept of significance.
  • Demonstrate good knowledge and understanding of the Tudors, significant events, people and changes.
  • Use the language of significance to describe important people, events and changes.
  • Construct explanations about several significant aspects of the Tudors reign.
  • Analyse and explain why different events, people and changes are more historically significant than others.
  • Understand the use of criteria to assess how significant an event, person or change was.
  • Evaluate how significant the Tudors were in British history and support this view.

What were the consequences of the Stuarts reign?

  • Use historical vocabulary in your work and use new vocabulary about the Stuarts.
  • Analyse the chronological place of the Stuarts in British History.
  • Use some accurate and relevant knowledge and information about the Stuarts in your explanations and link this to the historical concept of cause and consequence.
  • Demonstrate good knowledge and understanding of several key consequences of the Stuart reign.
  • Use the language of cause and consequence to describe important people, events and changes.
  • Construct explanations of several causes for changes, why an event happened and the consequences of it.
  • Prioritise some consequences of the Stuarts as more important than others within their reign.
  • Begin to analyse the links between different causes and consequences with in the reign of the Stuarts.
  • Understand the impact of the consequences on Britain, its political structure and power.
  • Evaluate the consequences of the Stuart reign and support this view.

Why do historians disagree that everyday life improved between 1500 and 1750?

  • Use historical vocabulary in your work and use new vocabulary about everyday life and interpretations.
  • Analyse the chronological place of Early Modern Britain in British History.
  • Use some accurate and relevant knowledge and information about different historians and everyday life in your explanations and link this to the historical concept of interpretations.
  • Demonstrate good knowledge and understanding of everyday life between 1500 – 1750, historical interpretations and historians.
  • Use the language of interpretation to describe historian’s viewpoints on everyday life.
  • Construct explanations about several different aspects of everyday life.
  • Understand the creation of different interpretations to the use of different sources and focus of different.
  • Know that historians can explain interpretations from different viewpoints and areas of study.
  • Apply historians’ interpretations to different aspects of Early Modern Britain to judge interpretations accuracy.
  • Evaluate if an interpretation of everyday life is accurate and support this view.

Why was slavery evident, and yet unpunished?

  • Use historical vocabulary in your work and use new vocabulary about slavery and the slave trade.
  • Analyse the chronological place of slavery and the slave trade in British History.
  • Use some accurate and relevant knowledge and information about the slave trade in your explanations and link this to the historical concept of interpretations.
  • Demonstrate good knowledge and understanding of the slave trade, its abolition and evidence about the topic.
  • Use the language of utility to describe evidence about the slave trade and its abolition.
  • Construct explanations about why the slave trade started, continued, was so terrible, was abolished and the utility of evidence involved.
  • Make supported inferences about the past by using a source and the detail contained within it.
  • Comment on the utility of a source as well as its reliability.
  • Make comments on utility and reliability by using content from at least two sources.
  • Formulate basic questions that are based on a single line of enquiry.
  • Describe why these would be important questions to answer.
  • Understand the accuracy and reliability of evidence when examining the slave trade and its abolition.
  • Analyse the evidence of slavery, the slave trade and its abolition to consider why it happened, stopped and went unpunished.
  • Evaluate the actions of those involved in the slave trade and its abolition and support this view.

Did Britain change between 1750 and 1900?

  • Use historical vocabulary in your work and use new vocabulary about Industrial Britain.
  • Analyse Industrial Britain’s chronological place in British History.
  • Use some accurate and relevant knowledge and information of Industrial Britain in your explanations and link this to the historical concept of change and continuity.
  • Demonstrate good knowledge and understanding of Industrial Britain.
  • Use the language of change to describe developments in Industrial Britain.
  • Understand changes are measured in different ways in Britain between 1750-1900 (e.g. political, economic, pace, extent) and apply these to some examples Industrial Britain.
  • Understand that changes differ depending on the timescale or the person looking at the change.
  • Construct explanations about several changes and continuities for Britain between 1750 - 1900.
  • Evaluate the change or continuity during Britain 1750 – 1900 and support this view.